Corrections and correctional facilities as a public health setting in Canada

In the current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic context, there has been increasing attention to correctional facilities and other congregate settings as catalysts for infectious disease transmission. It is well known that infectious and other diseases are prevalent in correctional facilities around the world and Canada is no exception. Rachlis et al. discuss the importance of considering…

News

2020 Sexually Transmitted and Blood-Borne Infection (STBBI) and Harm Reduction Resources

NCCID has curated a list of substance use harm-reduction resources. They provide relevant substance use information that aims to increase access to harm reduction supplies and programming to support people who are using substances and prevent sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections and other harmful outcomes.  NCCID has also put together the following list of sexually…

National Forum on STBBI Testing and Linkages to Care: Reaching the Undiagnosed

February 4-5, 2020 – OTTAWA, ON Hosted by the CIHR Centre for REACH 3.0 / MAP Centre for Urban Health Solutions, the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCCID) & the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), the Sexually Transmitted and Blood-borne Infections (STBBI) Testing and Linkages to Care: Reaching the Undiagnosed forum drew over…

Harm Reduction in a Rural Setting: Lessons learned from HCV and HIV outbreaks in Scott County, Indiana

The increased use of crystal methamphetamine and other drugs has led to an increased demand for needle and syringe harm reduction services across Canada. There have been a small number of HIV outbreaks in rural parts of Canada, but these environments have mostly limited services for harm reduction and sexually transmitted and blood-borne infection (STBBI)…

Point-of-Care Testing for Sexually Transmitted and Blood‐Borne Infections: A Canadian Realist Review

Canada has endorsed global targets to eliminate sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI) as public health threats by 2030. Despite these goals, STBBI – including HIV, hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV), human papilloma virus (HPV), Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, syphilis, and Trichomonas vaginalis – continue to be important public health concerns. Notably, reported…

Plains Speak on STBBIs, 2019 An emergent challenge for the Prairies: Meeting Proceedings

Sexually transmitted and blood borne infection (STBBI) rates—including syphilis, gonorrhea (NG), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)—are rapidly increasing in the Prairie provinces. Public health professionals are struggling to set programmatic priorities and identify the best interventions to suit the epidemiological context to decrease the burden of infections. Currently in…

Event

PLAINS SPEAK on STBBIs, 2019: An emergent challenge for the Prairies

Winnipeg, MB March 14th and 15th, 2019 Sexually transmitted and blood borne infection (STBBI) rates—including syphilis, gonorrhea, HBV, HCV, and HIV—are rapidly increasing in the Prairie provinces. Public health professionals are struggling to set programmatic priorities and identify the best interventions to suit the epidemiological context to decrease the burden of infections. Currently in the…

Congenital syphilis: Jared Bullard

In this final episode of our series on syphilis and public health, we hear from Dr. Jared Bullard, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at the University of Manitoba and Children’s Hospital in Winnipeg. He discusses recent increases in cases of congenital syphilis, the risks it poses to a fetus, as well as prevention strategies.

Exploring alternative methods to HIV testing to meet Canada’s obligation to UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets: Meeting Proceedings

The National HIV/AIDS Laboratories, National Microbiology Laboratory, and the Public Health Agency of Canada, together with the Saskatchewan HIV/AIDS Research Endeavour and the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases brought together partners and participants to foster a reflection on alternative methods for HIV testing.