Data Management/Coordination & Refugee Health: Experience of Hamilton Public Health Services

NCCID’s series of public health podcasts and webinars on refugee health continued with this November 16, 2016 presentation about one Ontario city’s recent experience with data management/coordination. The City of Hamilton Public Health Services team was responsible for creating a strategy on the fly, working with several agencies to collect, collate and share such basic data as the names, ages, sex and location/address of refugees, but also vaccination status, health assessment status and dental screening results.

An archived copy of this webinar is available upon request. Please email qadarsmz@umanitoba.ca.

Refugee Oral Health: Interim Federal Health Plan (IFHP) Coverage

In this October 18, 2016 presentation, our two presenters delved into refugee oral health, both in children and adults. Content covered key findings from Manitoba and Saskatchewan, including the oral health needs of immigrants and refugees in Winnipeg and the coverage offered by IFHP (Interim Federal Health Program), and a large scale refugee oral health program offered by the University of Saskatchewan.

For an archived version of this webinar, contact NCCID Project Manager Zeeshan Qadar at qadarsmz@umanitoba.ca.


SPEAKERS

Dr. Robert Schroth

Dr. Schroth, DMD, MSc, PhD, is an Tenure Associate Professor and Clinician-Scientist, Department of Preventive Dental Science and Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Associate Professor, Department of Oral Biology, Department of Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba. In addition, he is a member of the Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba (CHRIM) and also presently holds a CIHR embedded clinician researcher. His main research interests include Early Childhood Caries (ECC) and the role that nutrition and prenatal factors have on infants and preschool oral health. Two major studies investigating the relationship between vitamin D deficiencies and both enamel hypoplasia and ECC in an urban Aboriginal population. He has also been involved in other ECC epidemiological work involving Aboriginal, rural, and Hutterite preschool populations. Dr. Schroth is a key participant in the Healthy Smile Happy Child Project (The Manitoba Collaborative Project for the Prevention of Early Childhood Tooth Decay), a Manitoba Health grant funded project guided by the pillars of community development, oral health promotion/education, and research/evaluation.

Dr. Alyssa Hayes

Dr. Hayes, BDENT (HONS), MSC, FRCD(C), is an Assistant Professor in the College of Dentistry at the University of Saskatchewan. During her work as Dental Officer in rural New South Wales (NSW) she worked closely with dental assistants, dental therapists and students (both locally and foreign-trained) to deliver care to marginalized populations. She had been active in Community Dental Health Services Research Unit (CDHRSU) in Toronto. She is also the recipient of the Canada Health Infoway Faculty Inter-professional E-Health Award.

Note: Funding for the series was provided by the Public Health Agency of Canada. The opinions expressed are those of the speaker(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official views of the Agency or NCCID.

Canadian Roundtable on Antimicrobial Stewardship

Canadian Roundtable on Antimicrobial Stewardship

June 16-17, 2016; Toronto, ON

Co-hosts: NCCID and HealthCareCAN

Facilitator:  Dorothy Strachan, Strachan-Tomlinson

Summary: Over 50 “Champions of Change”—experts, key influencers and stakeholders in the fields of antimicrobial stewardship and resistance—gathered to help build a national action plan for antimicrobial stewardship (AMS). (A draft action plan will be posted soon). Discussion began with certain assumptions about what would make for an effective AMS action plan. That is, the plan should align with global and federal AMS efforts, cross institutional and community settings, and aim for better cooperation among human health, animal health and environmental initiatives. Because antimicrobial resistance is a serious threat to public health, participants called for concrete and actionable steps.

Over the day and a half, Roundtable participants outlined many concrete steps that can be taken to develop, implement and monitor AMS programs in communities and in hospitals in Canada. The event encouraged consensus on basic priorities, identified opportunities for collaboration and specific commitments, and explored potential funding sources, governance options, and policy levers that could support more coordinated AMS efforts in Canada. See the meeting report for more details.

Roundtable objectives:

  1. Gather the information required to inform the development of a Canadian Action Plan;
  2. Link domestic and international AMS efforts;
  3. Identify key leaders and related accountabilities for the AMS post-Roundtable Action Plan, including commitments to new benchmarks and targets; and
  4. Continue to build community awareness and a common language in support of implementing the AMS Action Plan.

Speakers:

  • Gregory Taylor, Chief Public Health Officer for Canada
  • Andrew Morris, Director ASP, Mount Sinai Hospital ‐ University Health Network
  • David Patrick, Medical and Epidemiology Lead, AMR and Do Bugs Need Drugs Program, BC Centre for Disease Control
  • John Conly, Lead for the Alberta Health Services Regional AMS Program
  • Arjun Srinivasan, Associate Director for Healthcare‐Associated Infection Prevention Programs, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Stephan Harbarth, Section Head, Infection Control Programme, University Hospitals of Geneva

Background / further reading: